Sunday, May 8, 2016

Overlapping Waves

Sample knit with Creamy Cotton Sport (this color is sold out)

Multiple of 6 + 4

Row 1 (RS): k2, * yo, ssk, k4; repeat from * to last 2 sts, yo, ssk.
Row 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: purl
Row 3: k2, * yo, k1, ssk, k3; repeat from * to last 2 sts, yo, ssk.
Row 5: k2, * yo, k2, ssk, k2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, yo, ssk.
Row 7: k2, * yo, k3, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last 2 sts, yo, ssk.
Row 9: k2, * yo, k4, ssk; repeat from * to last 2 sts, yo, ssk.

Repeat these 10 rows for the pattern.

Happy Knitting!


2 comments:

Sunny CA said...

I am one of the many people who is a huge fan of your YouTube videos. Your beautiful efficient knitting led me to learn Continental. Now I don't want to knit English! I have found a pattern: Fishnet Lace. The pattern is K4, *yarn forward, knit 2 together* to last 4 stitches, K4.
I cannot figure out how to bring the yarn forward and knit two together using Continental. Or maybe I just do not understand the instructions. I would LOVE it if you would post a video of Fishnet Lace. I love the result. I searched your videos and found Birds Eye, so I think for the moment I will knit Birds Eye, as it has a similar final result, but I would love to learn FIshnet Lace.

Sapphires-N-Purls said...

Sunny, all you are doing is making a yarn over. Some patterns use 'yarn forward' instead of yarn over; I believe that is usually used in British patterns to differentiate when a yarn over is being made before a knit or purl. You might also see it as 'yarn around needle'. Basically, if there is supposed to be a hole there, make a yarn over regardless of the term used. If you see strands across the front of the pattern though, you are usually bringing the yarn forward and holding it in front while stitches are slipped.