Sunday, September 11, 2011

Wicker Stitch

Sample knit with Cascade 220




This stitch makes a somewhat dense fabric.  The twisted or woven effect is achieved by working the stitches in groups of two - the second stitch is worked first, and then the first stitch is worked, and then both are dropped from the left needle.  It's not as complicated as it sounds, it's actually fairly simple.

This is a two row repeat, worked on a multiple of two stitches, and you can add as many or as few extra stitches as you like to create a border if you wish.  My favorite border to add to most of my knitted items is a seed stitch border, but a garter stitch border works just as well.  Whatever you like!

Row 1: Knit second stitch on left needle through the back loop, leaving it on the left needle.  Then, knit the first stitch through the back loop, and drop both from the left needle at the same time.  
Row 2: Purl one, Purl the second stitch, leaving it on the left needle.  Then, purl the first stitch, and drop both from the left needle at the same time.  Repeat to last stitch, Purl 1.

Repeat these two rows for pattern.

Here is the video for this stitch.  Enjoy!



15 comments:

redpotato said...

It always seems so easy to knit the stitches you post because the yarn you use always seems to stretch just the way you want it to. However, when I attempt to do these stitches on my own, my yarn never seems to stretch. Are there any tips on what I can do to overcome this problem?

Sapphires-N-Purls said...

I don't have as easy a time as it may look. I just keep reshooting until I have a clip where I don't have a mis-hap. I also practice the stitch so I know where I have a hard time getting the yarn to cooperate, and in these instances I always try to note for folks that if you "work the previous row a little looser than normal", or "wiggle the needle a little to help loosen the stitch", it will be easier to work the pattern. If you are a tight knitter, try knitting a little looser, or use a larger needle. Of course, if gauge is important to your project, you will need to take that in consideration.

redpotato said...

Thank you so much for your advice :D I will definitely give those stitches another try :)Just clarification, but what do you mean by gauge?

terri said...

I was wondering.. would this stitch work well with a full length sweater coat? or will the stitch called the wrap stitch be better? thanks for your help and advice in advance.

Sapphires-N-Purls said...

Terri, you can use whichever stitch you like! I wouldn't say that one is necessarily better than the other. If you like both, maybe use one for the main part, and the other as an accent - like on the collar or around the bottom for example.

Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
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Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...

Hello,
I did this weave: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsV5b5asMNQ&feature=player_embedded
but the end result was different than in your photos.
It came to me like this: http://abc_robotek_na_drutach.republika.pl/str/sploty_fantazyjne_krzyzowane.html # 221
greet Alice

Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alicja Astapko-Kumorek said...

sorry for the repetition, for a long time held the F5

Unknown said...

Is it possible to do this in a round? I've been looking far and wide and can't find any info or figure it out myself. I wanted to make gloves with it, but it seems to me that if I just going to continue knitting it will me more of a spiral rather than a wicker pattern. All help is greatly appreciated!

Sapphires-N-Purls said...

Check the top of the blog, there is a tab with info for converting stitches for circular knitting.